Those of you who fly frequently undoubtedly have all sorts of pet peeves: the screaming child two rows up, the toddler repeatedly kicking your chair, the in-flight magazine with the crossword already done…in pen. Yes, flying is full of things that can make you fly off the handle, but you’re not the only ones with pet peeves: stewardesses and stewards have them too. This is important to you, the traveler, as you want to remain on their good side. The following is a list of ways to anger the in-flight help and possibly be asked to leave.

Unwarranted Pushing of the Call Button: The call button isn’t something you should push frequently…if ever. Instead of pushing it for unnecessary things – such as asking for a seventh beer – reserve it for essential things, like asking for a barf bag. Remember, whenever you constantly push the stewardess call button, you are ultimately pushing the stewardess’s buttons.

Asking them to do things you can do yourself: Asking a steward to retrieve a pillow from the overhead compartment as you hold a sleeping baby in your arms is one thing, asking a steward to retrieve a pillow from the overhead compartment because you are too lazy to get up is a whole different ballgame. Stewards and stewardesses are busy people; there are only a few of them and a lot of passengers. Cut them a break and don’t expect them to do things you could more easily do yourself.

Complaining about things beyond their control: Sure, flying has its share of discomfort – the turbulence, the affect of altitude on your ear drums, the air sickness rumbling in your stomach – but the second you purchase a plane ticket, you agree to these discomforts. Complaining to the stewardesses about things that are beyond their control is completely futile. Telling the stewardess that you are angry your flight took off twenty minutes late will get you nowhere, unless that very stewardess happens to have a time machine.

Being Rude: Ah, rudeness; so prevalent yet so pointless. There are few things that will get you on the bad side of a flight attendant quicker than being rude. Chances are the stewards and stewardesses are doing things as efficiently and quickly as they can. Be patient, be polite and make “please” and “thank you” part of your vocabulary.

Ignoring Instructions: When a flight attendant explains how to put on an oxygen mask, there is a reason. When a flight attendant asks you to put your tray table up, there is a reason. When a flight attendant tells you to turn off your electronics during take off, there is a reason. Instead of ignoring the reasons, and ignoring the flight attendant, simply do what they ask and listen to what they say; they know what they are talking about: they have more experience flying than you do.

Flying can test the patience of anyone, even a monk. But it still remains the most convenient form of travel. Instead of being rude or relying on the flight attendants for far too many things, cut them some slack and do your part to keep the friendly skies just that.



Source by Jennifer Jordan